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Contexualising Social Media Archaeology

DOI: 10.15340/978-625-00-9894-3_1

Published: 2021 | Pages: 1 - 16

Uğur Bakan
Department of Visual Communication Design, Izmir Kâtip Çelebi University, Turkey

ugur.bakan@ikcu.edu.tr

Lara Martin Lengel
School of Media and Communication, Bowling Green State University, USA

lengell@bgsu.edu

Since the first conceptualisation of medienarchäologie [media archaeology] by 1996 by Siegfried Zielinski, the Founding Director of the Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln [Academy of Media Arts Cologne] who envisioned an approach “which in a pragmatic perspective means to dig out secret paths in history, which might help us to find our way into the future” (p. 274), to the first scholarly collection of work by Erkki Huthamo and Jussi Parikka (2011), this newly emerging subdiscipline of media studies has grown considerably during the past decade1 and continues to be of substantial interest. 
The development of this emerging subdiscipline of media studies and, more specifically, media archaeology is so new that there is a substantial lack of scholarly work on social media archaeology. Nevertheless, social media archaeology shares a number of characteristics and identifying details of media archaeology and the social, political, economic cultural impact of social media and the materialities of communication. Both follow and problematise the notion of archaeology from Michel Foucault (1972), and both are “concerned with the material, the matter that functions as not just foundational, but that which sits below the foundation” (McDowell & Bassett, 2018, p. 1).

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Uğur Bakan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Visual Communication Design, Faculty of Art and Design at Izmir Kâtip Çelebi University, Turkey. He has more than 15 years of professional experience as a graphics, web, and print designer. He received his Ph.D. degree in the Department of Journalism, Ege University, Turkey. He has many works published in national and international journals. He has published extensively on media and digital culture. Bakan’s research focuses on the role of computer technologies in mediating communication between friends in digital environments. Game studies, alternative journalism, digital media systems, social media, graphics design, cultural studies, visual communication, and are among the areas of his academic interest. Dr. Bakan teaches courses in Interactive Media, Game Design, Visual Communication, and Design Culture. He has presented generative art and design research and artwork internationally. His writings have appeared in numerous publications (via Peter Lang, Actualidades Pedagógicas, Connectist, Estudios Sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, Turkish Review of Communication Studies, InterMedia, etc.), and he has presented at a variety of national and international design and education conferences.


Lara Martin Lengel is a Professor in the Ph.D.-granting School of Media and Communication at Bowling Green State University. Dr. Lengel began her research on transnational technology and cultural studies as a Fulbright Research Scholar and American Institute of Maghreb Studies Fellow in Tunisia (1993-1994). Her refereed research appears as lead articles in Text and Performance Quarterly, Journal of Communication Inquiry, International Journal of Health Communication, and Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, and in Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, Communication Studies, Studies in Symbolic Interaction, Gender & History, International and Intercultural Communication Annual, Feminist Media Studies, International Journal of Women’s Studies, International Journal of Communication, and Women & Language. She served as Guest Co-Editor for Global Media Journal and ESSACHESS–Journal for Communication Studies. Her books include Computer Mediated Communication (Thurlow, Lengel & Tomić), Casting Gender (Lengel & Warren, Eds.), Intercultural Communication and Creative Practice, and Culture and Technology in the New Europe. 

 

Cite this chapter as:

Bakan U. & Lengel M. L. (2021). Contexualising Social Media Archaeology. In: Bakan U. & Lengel M. L. (eds) Social Media Archaeology from Theory to Practice (pp. 1-16). MacroWorld Pub. https://doi.org/10.15340/978-625-00-9894-3_1


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